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Dear Readers,
Surgery, like any other international development program, requires careful impact assessment. Monitoring and evaluation has several important benefits, including its ability to assess whether the program is having its desired effect. This information allows surgeons and administrators to identify and improve upon weaknesses in the healthcare delivery system, resulting in better patient care. This assessment also provides effectiveness data to stakeholders. With proper reporting, funders can be confident in the reach of their investment, governments can place their trust in the organization, and patients can rest assured that their doctors are delivering quality care.

While the importance of assessing program effectiveness is clear, the methodology of doing so is far more intricate. Measuring surgical outcomes is especially difficult, “as intervention efficacy is not always immediately apparent, complications are often delayed, and follow-up of patients is limited.” However, with thorough planning and careful execution, surgery providers can achieve high-quality program evaluation, thereby equipping themselves with an indispensable tool for patient care improvement.

This issue of Site News explores the Preoperative and Follow-up condition of Cataract surgical monitoring, Key Performance Indicators and Post-operative complications. It also brings to you Quality and outcome indicators, Surgical complications and details and Immediate postoperative findings.

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Regards,
Library Team
The Issue Features...
Optical Dispensing
Vol.11 No.1 January & February 2014
•  Introduction
•  Dispensing and Lenses
•  Optics & Low Vision
•  Dispensing to Children
•  Optical Dispensing Association
•  Courses in Optical Dispensing
•  Useful Links for Opticians

•   Past Issues


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  • SIMPLE DISPENSING - EASY, ISNT IT: DISPENSING PART 1

  • The term simple dispensing can cover a multitude of sins, but here we will be discussing the elements of dispensing that could be considered as Best Practice. Although only possible to cover these aspects briefly, the text will look at some of the perhaps forgotten or neglected aspects of dispensing simple prescriptions. Areas outside this will be dealt with in a later article on Complex Dispensing which will cover such matters as high power lenses, dispensing for children, and anisometropic prescriptions.

  • DISPENSING KNOWLEDGE

  • Optometrists are skilled in many different areas of optics, yet one area which consistently lacks emphasis is dispensing. While practitioners may not dispense every day, without effective decision-making they can often fail to meet expectations that a patient has for their spectacles.

  • DISPENSING WITH OPPORTUNITY

  • In the enclosed space of the consulting room, it is easy to feel independent of practice activities on the other sideof the door. In many cases, the optometrist is isolated from the daily duties of the practice, due to the constantflow of patients in and out of the consulting room. Whether an optometrist is working in his or her own practice, oras an employee of an independent practice or multiple, he or she is frequently fully occupied throughout the day.

  • DISPENSING FOR FACIAL DISFIGUREMENT

  • In practice, patients can present with atypical facial characteristics, which demand a bit more time, skill and attention from the dispenser. This article explores the considerations and potential solutions in order to achieve a successful dispensing outcome for patients with facial disfigurement.

  • USE OF PRESCRIBED OPTICAL DEVICES IN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

  • To evaluate prescribed optical device use in terms of frequency and perceived usefulness among people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We also sought todetermine the tasks for which they were using their prescribed low vision device.

  • OPTICAL DISPENSING: THE SCIENCE OF VISION OR BLIND FAITH

  • The evidence for the basic optometric function of optical dispensing is discussed in terms of the basic principles of scientific debate. The degree of rigour applied to product testing and evaluation of most other medically related areas is lacking in the dispensing of spectacles. There has been much debate on the place of religious faith in our society. Religious belief masquerading as science has come in for particular scrutiny. However, little attention has been paid to the equally contentious issue of non-religious belief, within scientific disciplines, masquerading as science. It could be argued that optical dispensing is, to a significant degree, such a case.

  • A PILOT STUDY ON THE USE OF VISUAL FIELD EXPANDERS

  • The nature and magnitude of the visual difficulties of five volunteer patients with severely contracted visual field and high visual acuities was investigated by several techniques. These comprised a questionnaire providing a quantitative score of visual impairment, a specially devised visual search task, and an arbitrary method of estimating visual efficiency. Many aspects of visual impairment resulting from contract visual fields were revealed and discussed. Performance scores on the search task indicated that the field expander would probably be useful to a small number of cases for continuous wear, usually as a binocular bioptic system. Other cases might benefit from a clip-on or hand-held device for occasional use. Methods of manufacture and dispensing and difficulty in locating suitable patients were the major limiting factors in this study. The methods of assessment, and the optical system described in this study are worthy of further investigation and development for trial on a larger number of patients.

  • OPTICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR POINT-OF-CARE DIAGNOSTICS



  • OPTICAL SERVICES THROUGH OUTREACH IN SOUTH INDIA: A CASE STUDY FROM ARAVIND EYE HOSPITALS

  • There is an urgent need to increase refraction services in a comprehensive manner. One strategy would be to offer these services at all patient-contact opportunities, in the hospital or other fixed facility settings (for example, Vision Centres) and in outreach settings. The focus of this paper will be on optical services through outreach, based on the experiences of Aravind Eye Hospitals in South India.



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  • WORKING WITH VARIABLE CORRIDOR PROGRESSIVE LENSES

  • Variable progression corridors in progressive lenses can benefit patients by improving their intermediate and near visual performance. This article looks at the difference between fixed corridor lengths and compares them to the variable corridor products available today. It explores the terminology

  • VOCATIONAL DISPENSING: DISPENSE WITH CONFIDENCE PART 4

  • Beyond lenses that are dispensed for occupational reasons, including single vision, bifocal and progressive powered lenses, dispensing lenses for vocational reasons involves the dispenser being able to think outside the box in terms of the best available eyewear solution. This can include dispensing for patients who, for example, play sport and for those who for medical reasons may require special occupational appliances. This article provides a starting point for a host of patient groups who can be greatly helped by dispensing exactly the correct lens, frame or appliance for their vocational needs.

  • OCCUPATIONAL DISPENSING: DISPENSE WITH CONFIDENCE PART 3

  • When presbyopia sets in, a single vision correction fails to solve the problems which come with it. Unfortunately, single vision lenses do not offer correction over the range of vision required to perform both intermediate and near tasks. Therefore the dispensing optician should be capable of dispensing suitable occupational lenses to patients and so should have sufficient knowledge to do this. Occupational lenses can also be utilised in many other different facets of dispensing to satisfy patients other occupational requirements. This article discusses the key considerations to help improve practitioners confidence for performing such dispenses.

  • ASPHERIC LENSES: DISPENSE WITH CONFIDENCE PART 2

  • An aspheric lens is classified as one where either one, or both, surfaces are non-spherical. This article describes the various types of aspheric lenses and the main dispensing considerations

  • MAXIMISING LENS APPEARANCE: DISPENSE WITH CONFIDENCE PART 1

  • Dispensing spectacles is something of an art, which requires a myriad of skills to ensure that every patient and spectacle-wearer walks away from your practice with confidence that they have the best possible spectacles for them, not only in terms of the optical performance but also the cosmetic appearance. Anyone involved with dispensing spectacles must have the ability to assist the patient in choosing a suitable frame design relative to the refractive prescription. It is this second requirement which will use a dispensers knowledge for maximising lens appearance in the finished spectacles. This article offers guidance as to how this can be achieved.



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  • CERTIFICATE COURSE IN OPTICAL DISPENSING – ARAVIND EYE HOSPITAL

  • A trained optician is required for the management of avoidable blindness by means of modern scientific dispensing. Aravind Eye Care System offers advanced training in optical dispensing and trains the optical technicians in a well-equipped optical training centre. The objective of this course is to develop the opticianary skills and knowledge for quality vision care services.

  • CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

  • A dispensing optician analyses a written prescription from an ophthalmologist or optometrist and also considers the lifestyle and working environment of the patient. By taking accurate facial measurements, using sophisticated equipment, applying knowledge of ophthalmic lens materials and interpreting the prescription, the dispensing optician can order, manufacture and process ophthalmic lenses and produce devices to correct defects of vision.

  • OTEN – OPTICAL DISPENSING

  • Our Certificate IV Optical Dispensing course covers the skills and knowledge required by optical dispensers, to dispense and supply optical appliances as prescribed by optometrists and/or ophthalmologists in accordance with Australian Standards. The units of competency included in this qualification contribute to the gaining of an optical dispensers licence where this is required. Optical dispensers practice in a range of environments including optical dispensaries, optometric practices and laboratories. They may be self-employed or employed by another optical dispenser, an optometrist, a major optical dispensing company or other retailers.

  • RMIT UNIVERSITY

  • This program is delivered in both traineeship and non-traineeship modes. Optical dispensers work closely with optometrists, ophthalmologists and other healthcare professionals to provide optimum solutions for eyecare and eyewear needs. They interpret ophthalmic prescriptions to provide patients with advice on spectacle frames, lens selection, contact lenses, sunglasses and safety eyewear.Optical dispensers have a detailed understanding of spectacle frames and lenses, including their performance characteristics and effects on vision. They're also trained to perform spectacle repairs and fitting of lenses into frames as part of a unique fashion, health and technology-based industry.

  • THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PEDIATRIC DISPENSING - QUANTUM OPTICAL

  • This course, the student should be able to: recognize the special needs with regard to lens and frame options when fitting children; create a comfortable environment for both the patient and parent; describe safety and liability issues present when dealing with children; formulate a step-by-step procedure from initial consultation to final fitting and follow up care.



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  • OPTOMETRY TODAY

  • Optometry Today is the UKs leading publication for optometrists, ophthalmologists, dispensing opticians and students. Every fortnight the publication delivers a high-level CET article worth two points, additional articles, occasional peer-reviewed articles and the latest news and developments in the sector.

  • OPTICIANS MAGAZINE

  • Optician is the only weekly journal for the optical profession, providing a regular source of breaking news and expert analysis direct to eye care professionals. Every issue contains the latest jobs in optometry, helping you with your career.

  • ASSOCIATION OF OPTOMETRISTS



  • ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH DISPENSING OPTICIANS



  • MYERS LA ROCHE

  • Myers La Roche is the largest consultancy in the UK and Ireland specialising exclusively in the optical profession.

  • BRAEMAR FINANCE A DIRECT LENDER TO THE PROFESSION



  • SEE20/20: PRACTICE PERFECTION

  • See20/20 is a unique web-based ophthalmic practice management software solution with multi-site capability for Opticians and Optician Practices.



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